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Question:

15 lb vs 30 lb felt, when do I use which?

Answer:

On standard 4 in 12 or greater sloped roofs the UBC (Uniform Building Code) for California requirement is a single layer of 15 lb ASTM rated felt underlayment. If the slope is less than 4 in 12 but greater than 2 in 12, a double layer of 15 lb is required. The felt shall be installed shingle fashion starting from the bottom edge with an 18 strip being covered with a 36 strip then sub-sequent strips installed going up the roof at 18 increments. We find that 30 lb felt is an unnecessary expense when installing over plywood sheathing, but over 1 x 6 or any other board sheathing, although not required we recommend a 30 lb to help smooth and protect the more imperfect surface.

 
 

 

 
 

 

 
 

Question:

On tile roof installations, what felt system should I use?

Answer:

There are many newer products out there that have been tested and perform well. A lot of contractors prefer the modified 40 lb sheet. My only problem with this product is that it has a mica-like surface which can make the surface a little slick. If the roof is two story or greater, or the pitch is steeper than normal, application could be treacherous. The product itself is quite superior though. We have always gone with a double layer of 30 lb. The surface has a little more grip to it while installing, and were all about safety here!

 
 
 
 
 
 

Question:

Do I need to remove my existing roof membrane before I install a new roof?

Answer:

It depends on how many existing layers you have. The U.B.C. code allows for (3) layers maximum on pitched Roofs with slopes of 2 in 12 or greater. BUT beware that some counties and city building departments are allowed to modify upwards on U.B.C. codes. They may only allow (2) layers maximum, so it is always wise to have your contractor

Or yourself contact your local building department prior to any work being done. B.U.R. (built-up flat roofs) generally are allowed (2) layers providing that if the 1st layer is an existing gravel roof you remove the loose gravel and install a recovery board prior to the new membrane. We do not recommend anything less than a complete membrane removal prior to Installation on any B.U.R. installation.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Question:

Do I need to pull a permit?

Answer:

If you are re-roofing more than 1/5th of your building YES! Anything less is considered a repair. Jordan Roof Company obtains all the necessary permits when required on any of our re-roofing projects.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Questions:

I have multiple roofs now, how do I know if I will need to install plywood when re-roofing.

Answer:

The very best way is to peek in your attic or garage and just look up! If you see board sheathing that appears to be spaced from 4 to 6 apart YOU NEED plywood. It also means that your bottom roof is probably wood shake or shingle.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Question:

What fire rating is required in my area?

Answer:

Most building departments have adopted a requirement of class A fire rated materials only. Class A' (which is the highest) used to be only required in high fire areas (mountain areas), class B' in buffer zones (suburban areas adjacent to mountains), and class C (coastal non mountainous areas). Some cities (like Long Beach) still only require a class C' fire rating.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Question:

I love the look of real wood shake but my city requires a Class A' fire rating what do I do?

Answer:

Some building departments will allow a class B' fire rated shake roof with modifications. This could possibly mean solid sheathing and a 72lb mineral surface membrane, or a foil backing prior to installation. Wood products are designed to breathe so this application though will require additional roof venting to prolong the lifespan of your new shake. You may also check out some of the new simulated shake products out there.

 
 
 
     
 

Question:

What are the pro's and con's between wood vs simulated wood or tile.

Answer:

All high end products including wood, are cost prohibitive in comparison to composition shingles. Simulated shake or slate products are typically cementious and just like tile are not meant to be walked on without some real care about doing it. If you have a two story home that will require painting every 5 years there is a real chance of breakage by workers who may be careless trying to paint those second story walls and eaves. The downside to wood is its lifespan of is considerably less than the other products (almost half actually) and will not maintain its overall shape over time. Wood will shrink, cup and split over time. Some people like this though, their thinking typically is that of the charm and character of real wood.

 
     
 
 
 

Question:

What kind of attic ventilation do I need?

Answer:

The current code I believe is 64 square inches of free flow air space for every 150 square feet of flat attic space. Now that figure jumps up to 300 square feet if there are existing eave or side venting. One normal 18 dormer vent I believe has 162 inches of free flow air. A typical single story 1600 sq. ft home (not counting garage), has approximately 1200 sq. ft of flat attic space. That equates to about (1) 18 dormer for every 380 sq. ft of flat attic space or 3.16 dormers.

 
     
   

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